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Gender
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The organizations of the United Nations system are committed to enabling events at which everyone can participate in an inclusive, respectful and safe environment.

UN system events are guided by the highest ethical and professional standards, and all participants are expected to behave with integrity and respect towards all participants attending or involved with any UN system event.

Gender
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This document aims to initiate a discussion on gender mainstreaming in the work of the ozone treaties. It begins by providing a brief overview of international instruments on gender and the 2030 Agenda, to which the parties’ implementation of the ozone treaties has over the years made significant contributions. The 2030 Agenda clearly acknowledges the link between environmental protection and gender equality: Sustainable Development Goal 5 (SDG5) is aimed at achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls, and gender-related aspects are present within several other goals as well.

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When did we realize ozone depletion was an issue, and how did we fix it? By 1985, the globe had already seen advancements in the scientific understanding of ozone depletion and its impacts on human health and the environment. It was then that the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer was created in response. This agreement is a framework convention that lays out principles agreed upon by many parties. It does not, however, require countries to take control actions to protect the ozone layer. This would come later in the form of the Montreal Protocol. 
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Parties’ reports on illegal trade

Year of submission: 2019 | 2018

 EN     EN

Party (s) Year of submission
Armenia 2019
Australia 2019
Bulgaria 2019
Burkina Faso 2019
Micronesia, Federated States of, 2019
Thirteenth edition

The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer is a global agreement to protect the Earth’s ozone layer by phasing out the chemicals that deplete it. This phase-out plan includes both the production and consumption of ozone-depleting substances. The landmark agreement was signed in 1987 and entered into force in 1989. 

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Information on safety standards

This interactive tool presents a non-exhaustive list of international, regional and national safety standards relevant to Refrigeration, Air-Conditioning and Heat Pump equipment developed by relevant Standards Organizations.

The standards are broadly classified into two categories: Main system safety standards, subdivided into Vertical system safety standards and Horizontal system safety standards, and Supplementary standards.

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The year is 2065. Nearly two-thirds of Earth's ozone is gone -- not just over the poles, but everywhere. The infamous ozone hole over Antarctica, first discovered in the 1980s, is a year-round fixture, with a twin over the North Pole. The ultraviolet (UV) radiation falling on mid-latitude cities like Washington, D.C., is strong enough to cause sunburn in just five minutes. DNA-mutating UV radiation is up 650 percent, with likely harmful effects on plants, animals and human skin cancer rates. Such is the world we would have inherited if 193 nations had not agreed to ban ozone-depleting substances, according to atmospheric chemists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Bilthoven.