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The Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer logo was developed to provide a distinct brand for the two treaties across various communication assets and applications. The visual identity guideline is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of applications and correct use of the logo.

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No. Substance Name Chemical Formula ODP CAS No. Uses Mp/°C Bp/°C Producer Amount produced Manufacturing countries
1 Cyclobutane,1,2-dichloro-1,2,3,3,4,4-hexafluoro(or 1,2-dichloro-1,2,3,3,4,4-hexafluorocyclobutane or RC-316c) C4Cl2F6     Testing as a solvent in aerospace industry -15 59-60     Japan, Russian Federation, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America
2 Hexachlorobutadiene (or HCBD) C4Cl6 0.07 87-68-3 Solvent applications as well as an intermediate in the production of HFCs.          
3 n-propyl bromide (or 1-bromopropane, CH2BrCH2CH3 and nPB) 1-C3H7Br or CH2BrCH2CH3 0.0033-0.111 106-94-5 Solvent applications, including degreasing, vapour cleaning and cold cleaning of metal parts          
4 6-bromo-2-methoxynaphtalene (or bromo-methoxy-naphtalene or BMN) C10H6BrOCH3   511165-9 Solvent Applications          
5 Halon-1202 (or dibromodifluoromethane, difluorodibromomethane, Freon 12-B2, R12B2 or UN1941) CBr2F2 Best Estimate: 1.25 75-61-6 In fire protection systems for military-type aircraft. By-product which may be generated during production of Halon 1301 and 1211.          
6 1-bromo-3-chloropropane CH2ClBr or C3H6BrCl Guess - 0.05 109-70-6 Pharmaceutical industry. -59 142 Albemarle PPC SA, Fermion 10-5,000 tonnes 1990-1992 France
7 Dibromomethane CH2Br2   74-95-3 Formed during the production of bromochloromethane (BCM) as a by-product in a quantity of about 20 % of BCM. Used in the production of two insecticides. -52 96 Eurobrom BV, Albemarle SA, Cheminova Agro A/S 100-500 tonnes per company from 1991-1993 Belgium, Denmark, Netherlands
8 Bromochloroethane C2H4BrCl   107-04-0 Was used for soil fumigation. It is produced as a by-product of 1,2-dichloroethane. 1,1 Bromochloroethane: no information available. 9 131      
9 Dibromoethane C2H4Br2   106-93-4   -63 108      
10 Bromoethane C2H5Br   74-96-4 Used as starting material in the production of various chemicals. -199 38 Albermarle PPC SA, Atofina, Great Lakes Chem (EU or USA), BASF 10-500 tonnes per year, 1990-1993 France, Germany, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
11 1,3-Dibromopropane C3H6Br2   109-64-8 Synthesis of the fungicide pyracarbolid, various pharmaceuticals and polyamines. -34 167 Atofina 10-50 tonnes in 1993 France
12 2-Bromopropane C3H7Br   75-26-3 Formed as a by-product (0,1 ñ 0,2 %) of n-propylbromide. -89 60 Albermarle PPC SA, Atofina, Gt Lakes Chemical (Europe), Reidel-de Hein 10-500 tonnes per year, 1990-1993 France, Germany, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
13 C4Cl4F6 2,2,3,3-Tetrachloro hexafluorobutane CClF2CClF CClFCClF2   375-34-8 As Flon-S-316, a substitute for CFC-113     Asahi   Japan, United States of America
14 Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) CH2Cl2 non zero 75-09-2 Solvent, paint stripper, degreaser, to decaffeinate coffee and tea, flavour extacting, aerosol propellant, PU foam blowing. -97 40      
15 Trichloromethane (Chloroform) CHCl3 0.008-0.01 67-66-3 Production of HCFC-22, solvent -64 61      
16 Tetrachloroethene C2Cl4 0.006-0.007 127-18-4 Solvent, dry cleaning, degreaser, manufacture of HFC-134a -19 121      
17 Trichloroethene (Trichloroethylene) C2HCl3 0.0005-0.0007 79-01-6 Solvent, paint stripper, degreaser, to decaffeinate coffee and tea, manufacture of HFC-134a -73 87      
18 Dinitrogen oxide (nitrous oxide, R-744a) N2O 0.017 10024-97-2 Food additive (E942), Nylon production, medical uses, Propellant, fuel booster -91 -88      
19 Chloromethane (methyl chloride, R-40) CH3Cl 0.02 74-87-3 Production of silicone polymers, foam blowing, solvent -97 -24      
20 Trifluoroiodomethane (Trifluoromethyl iodide) CF3I 0.011-0.018 2314-97-8 Replacement of Halon 1301 -78 -23      
21 Iodomethane (methyl iodide, Halon 10001) CH3I 0.008-0.016 74-88-4 Replacement of methyl bromide, feedstock uses, fire fighting -66 42      
22 Phosphorous(III) bromide (phosphorous tribromide) PBr3 non zero 7789-60-8 Replacement of Halon 1301, Feedstock, Process agent -42 173  
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The eighth edition of the Handbook was published shortly after the Protocol, along with the Vienna Convention, achieved universal participation, by 196 Parties, on 16 September 2009 – the first treaties of any kind in the history of the United Nations system to achieve that aspiration. Now, three years later, with the addition of the newest member of the United Nations, South Sudan, and that country‟s accession to the Vienna Convention and the Montreal Protocol, we can still say that the ozone treaties maintain universal participation.

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The complete ninth edition of the handbook for the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer. The eighth edition of the Handbook was published shortly after the Convention, along with the Montreal Protocol, achieved universal participation, by 196 Parties, on 16 September 2009 – the first treaties of any kind in the history of the United Nations system to achieve that aspiration.

 

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This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part and in any form for educational or non-profit services without special permission from the copyright holder, provided acknowledgement of the source is made. UNEP would appreciate receiving a copy of any publication that uses this publication as a source.

Scientific articles
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Firn-air and ambient air measurements of CHF3 (HFC23) from three excursions to Antarctica between 2001 and 2009 are used to construct a consistent Southern Hemisphere (SH) atmospheric history. The results show atmospheric mixing ratios of HFC-23 continuing to increase through 2008. Mean global emissions derived from this data for 2006 – 2008 are 13.5 ± 2 Gg/yr (200 ± 30 1012 gCO2- equivalent/yr, or MtCO2-eq./yr), 50% higher than the 8.7 ± 1 Gg/yr (130 ± 15 MtCO2-eq./yr) derived for the 1990s. 

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By comparing the ozone depletion potential–weighted anthropogenic emissions of N2O with those of other ozone-depleting substances, we show that N2O emission currently is the single most important ozone-depleting emission and is expected to remain the largest throughout the 21st century. N2O is unregulated by the Montreal Protocol. Limiting future N2O emissions would enhance the recovery of the ozone layer from its depleted state and would also reduce the anthropogenic forcing of the climate system, representing a win-win for both ozone and climate.

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The 
following
 supplementary
 material
 provides
 additional
 details
 about
 our
 ozone
 depletion
potential,
 ODP, calculations,
 factors
 affecting
 the
 ODP 
of
 N2O,
 uncertainties
 unique
 to 
the
 calculation
 of
 the
 ODP
 of
 N2O,
 our
method
 of
 inferring 
N2O
 emissions,
 and
 a
comparison
 of 
the
 contributions
 of
 the
 sectoral 
N2O 
emissions
 with
 the
  emissions
 of
 methyl
 bromide.

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The consumption and emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are projected to increase substantially in the coming decades in response to regulation of ozone depleting gases under the Montreal Protocol. The projected increases result primarily from sustained growth in demand for refrigeration, air-conditioning (AC) and insulating foam products in developing countries assuming no new regulation of HFC consumption or emissions. New HFC scenarios are presented based on current hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) consumption in leading applications, patterns of replacements of HCFCs by HFCs in developed countries, and gross domestic product (GDP) growth.

This edition comes at a time when further steps taken by the Parties to develop interlinkages with other multilateral environmental agreements are coming to fruition.