Report of the 2nd Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol

Distr.
GENERAL

UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/3
29 June 1990

ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

SECOND MEETING OF THE PARTIES TO THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL ON SUBSTANCES THAT DEPLETE THE OZONE LAYER

London, 27 - 29 June 1990

REPORT OF THE SECOND MEETING OF THE PARTIES TO THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL ON SUBSTANCES THAT DEPLETE THE OZONE LAYER

INTRODUCTION

1. The Second Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was held at the headquarters of the International Maritime Organization, in London, from 27 to 29 June 1990, at the invitation of the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

I. OPENING OF THE MEETING

A. Opening remarks by the President of the Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer

2. His Excellency Mr. K. Bärlund, Minister of the Environment of Finland and President of the First Meeting of the Parties, declared the meeting open at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, 27 June 1990. He observed that real progress had been made in under three years: agreement had been reached on the Protocol in 1987; it entered into force early in 1989; and political agreement to strengthen the Protocol had been reached soon thereafter at the First Meeting of the Parties, held in Helsinki. A major task facing the Parties was to make financial resources and technology available to developing countries so that they could participate effectively in the international effort that was required.

B. Welcoming remarks by the Secretary General of the International Maritime Organization

3. Mr. W. O'Neil, SecretaryGeneral of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), welcomed participants to IMO headquarters. As an organization concerned with the marine environment, as well as the operation of ships, IMO recognized that CFCs and halons on board ship caused pollution. Yet, they played an essential role in ensuring safety at sea. There was, therefore, a clear need for changes to be devised and put into effect.

C. Statement by the Prime Minister of the Government of the United Kingdom

4. The Prime Minister of the Government of the United Kingdom, the Right/Honourable Mrs. Margaret Thatcher, stated that there was increasing scientific evidence of the damage caused to the ozone layer by CFCs and other/chemicals. However, over the previous 15 months there had been encouraging signs of success in convincing the public of the gravity of/the situation, as was shown by increased purchases of ozonefriendly products. The United Kingdom had called for a European Community initiative on labelling of products to reinforce that trend by providing honest information. Manufacturers were also constantly developing substitute technologies. It was now for Governments to build on the historic achievement of the Montreal Protocol and draw up a global convention on climate change, which ought to be ready by 1992, in time for the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development.

5. In view of the damage that had already been done to the ozone layer, the targets previously set in the Protocol were not ambitious enough. Higher targets and shorter deadlines must be set for reducing and eliminating CFCs and halons, and the scope of the Protocol must be extended to cover other substances such as carbon tetrachloride and methyl chloroform. The search for safe alternatives must be intensified, which was no easy task. British industry was making some notable contributions.

6. The controls in the Protocol could achieve successful results only if all/countries, including those from the third world, were signatories. But countries at any early stage of industrial development had understandable concerns about adverse effects on their economic growth. It was the duty of industrialized countries to help them with substitute technologies and with financing the additional costs involved. Britain supported the proposal for an initial threeyear programme of action and was ready to contribute at least $9 million to it, rising to $15 million if other major consumers joined the Protocol.

D. Statement by the Executive Director of UNEP and presentation of a Global 500 Award to the Prime Minister of the Government of the United Kingdom

7. Dr. Tolba, the Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), expressed his gratitude to the Prime Minister and the Government of the United Kingdom for hosting the meeting, as well as his appreciation to the SecretaryGeneral and staff of IMO for their contribution to its smooth organization. Noting the progress that had been made since the London "Saving the Ozone Layer" Conference had been held 15 months previously, he said that the groundwork for a successful conclusion of the meeting had been laid through the efforts of the OpenEnded Working Group of the Parties, which had met immediately prior to the current meeting. Difficulties, of course, remained but, in view of what was at stake, there was general agreement that failure could not be contemplated. Indeed, the importance of the meeting went beyond the issues immediately before it: a successful outcome would give rise to greater confidence in tackling the other, much more complex, environmental issues that loomed and would contribute to the establishment of a new political movement to deal with the environmental crisis, based on longterm benefit for all, and rooted in respect for the value of human life and for nature.

8. Finally, praising the United Kingdom Prime Minister for championing the cause of the ozone layer and for her statesmanship on other environmental issues, the Executive Director presented her with a Global 500 Award in recognition of/her outstanding work in putting the environment at the top of the international agenda and thus providing an example to many throughout the world.

II. ORGANIZATIONAL MATTERS

A. Attendance

9. The following 54 Parties to the Montreal Protocol were represented: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Byelorussian SSR, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Egypt, European Economic Community, Finland, France, German Democratic Republic, Federal Republic of Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Portugal, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukrainian SSR, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, United Kingdom, United States of America, Venezuela and Zambia.

10. The following 42 States not party to the Protocol were also represented: Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bangladesh, Barbados, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burundi, China, Colombia, Congo, Côte/d'Ivoire, Czechoslovakia, Dominica, Ecuador, El/Salvador, India, Kuwait, Malawi, Morocco, Myanmar, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Republic of/Korea, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Togo, Turkey, Uruguay, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zaire and Zimbabwe.

11. Observers from the following United Nations bodies and specialized agencies were also present: United Nations Office of Legal Affairs, United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), International Maritime Organization (IMO), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), World Bank and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

12. The following other organizations were represented: AFCAM Australia, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute, Alliance for Responsible CFC Policy, Ashrae, Australian Conservation Foundation, Brazilian Association of Electrical and Electronic Industries (ABINEE), Chemical Association (Austria), CIFL (United States), Consumers' Association (United Kingdom), Conference of European Churches, Du Pont International SA, Environment and Energy Study Institute, Environmental Resources Ltd., European Council of Chemical Manufacturers' Federations (CEFIC), European Free Trade Association (EFTA), Exploration and Production Forum, Federation of European Aerosol Associations (FEA), Friends of the Earth International, Greenpeace International, Halogenated Solvents Industry Alliance, ICOLS, Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), Institute for Cultural Affairs, Institute for Studies in Environmental Law (ISEL), International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), International Council of Environmental Law, International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), International Institute of Refrigeration, Japan Association for Hygiene of Chlorinated Solvents (JAHCS), Japan Electrical Manufacturers Association (JEMA), Japan Flon Gas Association, Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association (United States) (MVMA), Natural Resources Defense Council, Pharmaceutical Aerosol CFC Coalition, Program for Alternative Fluorocarbon Toxicity Testing (PAFT), Refrigeration Industry Board (RIB), Soci£t£ ECIA, SRF Ltd. (formerly Shri Ram Fibres), Stockholm Environment Institute, Ulsan Chemical Co. Ltd., Worldwatch, World Wide Fund for Nature International (WWF) and Ziegler and Associates.

B. Election of officers

13. In accordance with rule 21, paragraph 1, of the rules of procedure, the following officers were elected, by acclamation, at the opening meeting:

President:
Rt. Hon. Chris Patten, Secretary of State for the Environment, United Kingdom

VicePresidents:
Mr. Paulo Tarso Flecha de Lima, Ambassador of Brazil to the United Kingdom
Mr. Philip Woolaston, Minister of Conservation, New Zealand
Prof. Vladimir Zakharov, Deputy Chairman of the USSR State Committee for Hydrometeorology

Rapporteur:
Mr. Paul Malukutila, Minister of Water, Lands and Natural Resources, Zambia

C. Adoption of the agenda

14. The following agenda, as contained in document UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/1/Rev.4, was adopted:

  1. Opening of the meeting:

  2. Organizational matters:

  3. Consideration of the reports and notes of the Secretariat:

  4. Other decisions of the Parties.

  5. Consideration of the proposed budgets and proposed percentages and amounts of contributions by Parties.

  6. Other matters.

  7. Adoption of the report.

  8. Closure of the meeting.

D. Credentials

15. In accordance with rule 19 of the rules of procedure, the officers of the Meeting examined the credentials of representatives and, having found them to be in good and due form, so reported to the Meeting.

III. SUBSTANTIVE MATTERS

A. Introduction by the Executive Director

16. In his introductory statement, the Executive Director of UNEP, stressing the historic importance of the meeting and the remarkable progress achieved since the entry into force of the Montreal Protocol, said that industrial, scientific and governmental committees had accepted that the initial target of freezing CFC production and halving output would not save the ozone layer. Even if production of all ozonedepleting chemicals was stopped immediately, it would take 80 years to plug the ozone hole over Antarctica. CFCs were also major contributors to the greenhouse effect. The Bureau and the OpenEnded Working Group of the Parties had hammered out the proposed agreement currently before the Parties, an agreement that would pave the way for meaningful action by Governments. In terms of the provisions of a strengthened Protocol, UNEP endorsed the phasingout by the year 2000, and preferably earlier, of the five CFCs and three halons currently controlled and of all other fully halogenated CFCs; the elimination of the use of carbon tetrachloride and a considerable reduction in the use of methyl chloroform by the same date; and the inclusion of all substitutes on a separate list with a requirement for annual reports on their production and consumption, strict guidelines for their use and a commitment to phase them out within a specified period, together with a clear indication to industry that what was required were substitutes with no ozonedepleting or globalwarming potential. The issue of possible new halons should also be addressed.

17. Since the current 60 Parties to the Protocol were responsible for over 90/per cent of the production and consumption of ozonedepleting chemicals, the inclusion of those three elements would provide the basis for a meaningful instrument.

18. The Protocol must also be forwardlooking. One hundred States Members of/the United Nations had still to become Parties, among them, newly industrializing nations, two of which, in particular, represented over one third of mankind. Such nations required incentives to leapfrog the CFC phase in their industrial development and unless full agreement was reached on such incentives, there could be no meaningful Protocol. He was much encouraged by the fact that Parties were now ready to make provision for those incentives in the form of a financial mechanism and technology transfer. The OpenEnded Working Group had agreed upon target funding and a scheme for contribution to a properly financed multilateral fund designed to meet the incremental costs to developing countries of complying with the current and proposed strengthened provisions of the Protocol. The Meeting also had before it his/proposal for technology transfer, which was the outcome of the fullest consultations between Governments and industry.

19. The Parties therefore had before them the essential constituents of what UNEP considered to be a meaningful agreement. Stressing that far more than the ozone layer was at stake, he said that a successful outcome would give a tremendous boost to the forthcoming World Climate Conference and provide an impetus for the conclusion of conventions on such other major issues as climate change and biological diversity before the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in 1992. It would also show that the nations of the industrialized North were serious about tackling the inequity in the global economy, which was the underlying reason for the destruction of the human environment.

B. Statement by the SecretaryGeneral of the World Meteorological Organization

20. Professor G.O.P. Obasi, SecretaryGeneral of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), stated that WMO had oriented its activities in full support of international efforts to protect the atmosphere, in particular the ozone layer, from harmful human interventions. Through its various scientific and technical programmes, WMO provided its member States with authoritative scientific information on the behaviour of the atmosphere, including its climate, while its Global Ozone Observing System, which had been operational since the 1950s, supplied the only data set available for determining ozone trends.

21. The assessment carried out by WMO in 1988 and 1989, in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration of the United States and with UNEP, had confirmed the spectacular ozone losses over Antarctica during the austral spring were due to CFCs trapped in the winter circumpolar vortex. Such reductions would occur for many decades, even after a complete phaseout of the provision and use of CFCs. The assessment also unequivocably established that there had been measurable decline in total column ozone over the northern and southern hemisphere midlatitudes during the previous two decades. WMO data from stations in central Europe and Canada also revealed a very pronounced decline of nearly 0.5 per cent a year, while recent analysis of satellite measurements over the previous 11 years indicated a two to three per cent decline in the equatorial belt. His organization therefore strongly endorsed proposals for a rapid phaseout.

22. The monitoring of concentrations of ozone and ozonedepleting gases should be improved in order to evaluate the situation with greater precision. With that in mind, the WMO Executive Council decided in 1989 to establish a special fund for climate and atmospheric environment studies, for a total of $US 22 million, $US 78 million of which would be used to improve ozone monitoring capabilities, including assistance to developing countries in improving their networks. He appealed to participants to facilitate contributions by their Governments to the fund and observed, in that connection, that additional resources for WMO to carry out the tasks assigned to it under the Vienna Convention were slow in arriving.

C. General debate

23. General statements were then made by representatives of 50 States, including 11 nonParties, 1 regional economic integration organization and 4 nongovernmental organizations. Discussion focused on the proposed amendments and adjustments to the Protocol, and the proposals for a financial mechanism and the transfer of technology.

24. Many representatives from the developed countries were in favour of the proposed amendments and adjustments and wished to bring forward the date for the phasing out of CFCs to 1997, to achieve a reduction of 85 per cent in carbon tetrachloride by 1995 and reductions in methyl chloroform by the year 2000. Further limitations on halons were suggested. Many representatives of developed countries also reported that their national programmes were well ahead of the Protocol's scheduled dates and were more comprehensive with regard to controlled substances. A number of those delegations reported understanding and cooperation from national industries; some reported success by using a mixture of incentives and taxation measures, while others observed that setting deadlines, for example for the temporary use and eventual phaseout of HCFCs, encouraged industry to seek replacement substances with no ozonedepleting potential.

25. Several representatives of developing countries pointed out defects in the current operation of the Montreal Protocol. One such representative stated that potential investors had to be turned away because of the CFC quota imposed on national industries, and that developing countries were being asked to reduce production and consumption to a level 70 per cent below that of developed countries. Another such representative said that the conditions attached to strengthening the Protocol must be consistent with third world development.

26. On the general issue of the financial mechanism and technology transfer, several representatives of developing countries, some citing their country's debt problems, stated that their countries would need more cooperation, both financial and technological, with the developed countries, if they were to meet the deadlines laid down in the Protocol; one such representative said that the present offers of cooperation were inadequate. Other representatives pointed out that the disastrous environmental pollution in their countries would make compliance very difficult, although they were anxious to respect their obligations.

27. In respect of the financial mechanism, there was general agreement on the need for good faith between countries and equitable sharing. A number of representatives of developed countries referred to their country's responsibilities on the "polluter pays" principle. Some stated that their country's contribution to the Multilateral Fund would not in any way affect their other development assistance programmes. With regard to fixing contributions to the Multilateral Fund, a number of delegations proposed the use of the United Nations scale of assessments while others proposed a scale based on 1986 consumption of controlled substances. On the matter of "equitable sharing", several representatives mentioned the need for financing without conditionality while one suggested that guidelines were required in order to ensure that country studies, which were used for assessing incremental financing and for identifying the needs of developing countries, were made on a comparable basis, with the assistance of consultants.

28. The question of the appropriate administration for the financial mechanism was mentioned. An intergovernmental organization and a number of representatives of developing countries said that they would prefer it to be under the direct authority of the Parties through an executive committee. One representative urged that the executive committee be established forthwith, and another offered to host its first meeting, defraying the administrative cost of organizing the meeting and costs associated with developing country participation. Several delegations expressed interest in serving on the executive committee. The representative of a major potential contributor said that his country agreed to the programme of technical financial cooperation provided that it did not create a new bureaucracy, that it used UNEP to manage/the clearinghouse functions, the World Bank to finance the needed investments, and UNDP to assist in feasibility and preinvestment studies. He added that the programme should not be viewed as a precedent for other issues or negotiations, where conditions might well be different. Another delegation envisaged the role of the World Bank as being that of a consultant.

29. A number of representatives referred to the conditions for transfer of technology. Several delegations referred to the need for fairly priced substitutes and technology. Real cooperation with and understanding by industry was indispensable, because protection of the environment should not be turned into an opportunity for a few enterprises to make exorbitant profits. Another representative mentioned the importance of cooperation from multinationals. A representative of a developing country expressed concern that, while developed countries designed national laws to prevent the transfer of ozonedestructive technology, they professed themselves unable to guarantee the transfer of ozonefriendly technologies. Another representative urged that technological information be shared, and one developing country delegation considered that the transfer of technology should be free of charge. The representatives of two developing countries that are major food producers pointed out the importance of refrigeration to their economies.

30. While it was generally agreed that recent scientific data left no doubt that the ozone layer was in peril over both Antartica and the Arctic, a number of delegations called attention to the need for greater scientific knowledge about the situation and some mentioned in that connection that their respective countries were launching meteorological satellites to monitor the ozone layer.

31. Several delegations mentioned the special concern of their respective countries in view of their geographical location in either the high southern or high northern latitudes. Some observed that new types of threat to the ozone layer were emerging with the development of highaltitude supersonic aircraft and the increased number of heavy rockets and space shuttles.

32. Many delegations urged that all countries should be encouraged to become Parties to the Protocol. One delegation proposed that special assistance should be extended to nonParty developing countries. The representatives of one nonParty pointed out that the financial mechanism to be established would be a temporary arrangement to cover the period 19911993 and that final agreement on the article relating to the transfer of technology was not assured; however, the country concerned would seriously consider acceding to the Protocol. The representative of another developing country not Party to the Protocol pointed out that his country fell awkwardly between the provisions of Article/2 and Article/5 of the Protocol, because of its level of per capita consumption of the controlled substances. He urged that an attempt should be made to accommodate such countries in the Protocol as soon as possible.

33. Many delegations expressed the hope that a successful outcome to the current negotiations on the Protocol would pave the way for further concerted measures to protect the environment, particularly in respect of climate change and global warming. Reference was made to the desirability of presenting to the 1992 Conference on Environment and Development a draft convention on climate.

34. One observer group stated that the crucial issue which participants needed to resolve was the amount of production of CFCs to be allowed up to the date when phaseout was completed. The proposals of the Executive Director of UNEP led to a global estimate of 5.5 million tonnes. The European Community's proposals implied about 2 million tonnes. That was a wide divergence. Bearing in mind the more alarming picture painted by recent findings, the observer group urged delegates to incline towards a low rather than a high production tonnage. With regard to methyl chloroform, it stated that it would be feasible to require production to be terminated by 1992.

35. Another observer group expressed concern about the direction being taken by the meeting. It seemed that delegations would be satisfied if they reached agreement on measures which would allow pollution levels to climb by 50 per cent by the time CFC phaseout was completed. Nobody could claim that that would be a safe outcome for future generations nor that the decision had been reached in ignorance of the risks. If some countries could phase out CFCs rather quickly, why should not other advanced industrialized countries be able to do the same? On the financial issues involved, it had no doubt that if the wealthier countries were sincerely concerned about halting the depletion of the ozone layer, they could raise much larger sums than had been mentioned, for application in developing countries as well as in their own.

36. A third observer group expressed dissatisfaction with the amount of progress made. The Vienna Convention signalled agreement to save the ozone layer and endorsed the precautionary principle. Subsequent events showed reaction rather than action as the ruling principle. It estimated that the proposed amendments to the Protocol could lead to the production of about 17 million tonnes of CFCs before phaseout was complete. Phaseout of HCFCs could feasibly be set for an earlier date. As proposals stood, it was doubtful whether the new international fund would be financially adequate; moreover, the obligations to provide technology assistance to developing countries should be made clearer and more explicit.

37. A delegate from the Australian youth delegation said that words uttered in the name of Governments were not always matched by deeds. She appealed to participants to make decisions which would reflect intergenerational equity. Young people realized that their fate was tied to what happened to the words appearing in square brackets in texts under negotiation, and they were apprehensive of the outcome.

D. Action by the Meeting

38. Under agenda items 3, 4 and 5, the Meeting had before it the reports of the Secretariat on the status of implementation of the Protocol (UNEP/Pro.OzL.Pro.2/2 and Corr.1, Add.1 and Add.3), on data submitted to the Secretariat on production, imports and exports of controlled substances (UNEP/Ozl.Pro.2/2/Add.4/Rev.1) and on financial implications and arrangements, including the adoption of a revised budget (UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/2/Add.5 and Corr.1 and 2). It also had before it a draft noncompliance procedure (UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.1) recommended by the Ad Hoc Working Group of Legal Experts on NonCompliance in accordance with decision 8 (a) of the First Meeting of the Parties and draft texts submitted for its consideration by the OpenEnded Working Group of the Parties, including a draft resolution (UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.2), draft adjustments to the Protocol (UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.3), a draft Amendment to the Protocol (UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.4/Rev.1), draft decisions (UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.5/Rev.1) and appendices to draft decision II/8 (UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.6).

39. After extensive deliberations, the Meeting agreed on amended versions of the draft adjustments to the Protocol, the draft Amendment to the Protocol, the draft decisions and the appendices to draft decisions II/8 that had been submitted to it by the OpenEnded Working Group. These amended texts, contained, respectively, in documents UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.3/Rev.1, UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.4/Rev.2, UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.5/Rev.2 and L.9/Rev.1, L.11 and L.14, and UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.6/Rev.1, together with the draft procedure on noncompliance (UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.1), were adopted by the Meeting at its final session, on 29 June 1990, by consensus and, except as noted in paragraphs 4143 below, without comment or further amendment, as reflected in the following section.

IV. DECISIONS

40. The Second Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer decided:

Decision II/1. Adjustments and reductions

Decision II/2. Amendment of the Protocol

Decision II/3. Halons

Decision II/4. Isomers

Decision II/5. Noncompliance

Decision II/6. Article 19 (Withdrawal)

Decision II/7. Montreal Protocol Handbook

Decision II/8 Financial Mechanism

  1. The Interim Financial Mechanism is established for the purposes of providing financial and technical cooperation, including the transfer of technologies, to Parties operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 of the Montreal Protocol to enable their compliance with the control measures set out in Articles 2A to 2E of the Protocol. The Mechanism, contributions to which shall be additional to other financial transfers to Parties operating under that paragraph, shall meet all agreed incremental costs of such Parties, in order to enable their compliance with the control measures of the Protocol. An indicative list of the categories of incremental costs is attached as Appendix I to this decision.*

  2. The Mechanism established under paragraph 1 shall include a Multilateral Fund. It may also include other means of multilateral, regional and bilateral cooperation.

  3. The Multilateral Fund shall:

  4. The Multilateral Fund shall operate under the authority of the Parties who shall decide on its overall policies.

  5. The President of the Second Meeting of the Parties shall ensure that the Executive Committee establishes, with effect from 1 January 1991, an "Interim Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol" and draws up the financial regulations and rules of the Fund.

  6. The Parties hereby establish an Executive Committee to develop and monitor the implementation of specific operational policies, guidelines and administrative arrangements, including the disbursement of resources for the purpose of achieving the objectives of the Multilateral Fund. It is established for a threeyear period. Before the end of that threeyear period, the terms of reference of the Executive Committee shall be reviewed by the meeting of the Parties. The Executive Committee shall discharge its tasks and responsibilities specified in its terms of reference as agreed by the Parties, with the cooperation and assistance of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (World Bank), the United Nations Environment Programme, the United Nations Development Programme, or other appropriate agencies depending on their respective areas of expertise. The members of the Executive Committee, which shall be selected on the basis of a balanced representation of the Parties operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 and of the Parties not so operating shall be endorsed by the Parties. The terms of reference of the Executive Committee are attached as Appendix II to this decision.*

  7. The Multilateral Fund shall be financed by contributions from Parties not operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 in convertible currency or, in certain circumstances, in kind and/or in national currency, on the basis of the United Nations scale of assessments as set out in Appendix III to this decision.* Contributions by other Parties shall be encouraged. Bilateral and, in particular cases agreed by a decision of the Parties, regional cooperation may, up to twenty per cent and consistent with any criteria specified by decision of the Parties, be considered as a contribution to the Multilateral Fund, provided that such cooperation as a minimum:

    The terms of reference of the Multilateral Fund are attached as Appendix IV to the present decision.*

  8. The Parties shall decide upon the programme budget of the Multilateral Fund for each fiscal period and upon the percentage of contributions of the individual Parties thereto.

  9. Resources under the Multilateral Fund shall be disbursed with the concurrence of the beneficiary Party.

  10. Decisions by the Parties under this decision shall be taken by consensus whenever possible. If all efforts at consensus have been exhausted and no agreement reached, decisions shall be adopted by a twothirds majority vote of the Parties present and voting, representing at least a majority of the Parties operating under paragraph 1 of Article/5 present and voting and at least a majority of the Parties not so operating present and voting.

  11. The Financial Mechanism set out in this decision is without prejudice to any future arrangements that may be developed with respect to other environmental issues.

  12. References to dollars ($) in the appendices to this decision are to United States dollars.
* The appendices to this decision are contained in annex IV of the present report.

Decision II/8 A. Budget for the Fund Secretariat

Decision II/8 B. Acceptance of offer of Canada

Decision II/9. Data reporting

Decision II/10. Data of developing countries

Decision II/11. Destruction technologies

Decision II/12. Customs Cooperation Council

Decision II/13. Assessment panels

Decision II/14. Workplans required by Articles 9 and 10 of the Protocol

Decision II/15. Extension of the mandate of the Open-Ended Working Group of the Parties

Decision II/16. Amendment of the Vienna Convention

Decision II/17. Budget

Decision II/18. Meetings of the OpenEnded Working Group

Decision II/19. Rules of procedure for meetings of the Parties

Decision II/20. Third Meeting of the Parties

Comments made at the time of adoption of the decisions

Decision II/2

41. Following the adoption of decision II/2, the representative of India said that the original text of the Protocol had/contained provisions which discriminated against developing countries: the amended text met many of their concerns. She would therefore recommend it to the Government of India for signature.

42. The representative of China said that useful progress had been made. He would recommend to the Chinese Government that it should ratify the amended text.

Decision II/8

43. In introducing draft decision II/8, the President drew attention to an earlier statement by the delegation of Ireland, speaking as the President of the Council of Ministers of the Environment of the European Communities, in which it had stated that the European Economic Community, which was a Party to the Montreal Protocol, would not be able to contribute to the Multilateral Fund and that the contributions of all other paying Parties would have to rise by a small percentage in consequence. With that provisio, draft decision II/8 and the scale of contributions as it appears in appendix III to that decision were adopted.

V. CONSTITUTION OF THE COMMITTEES ESTABLISHED BY THE DECISIONS OF THE SECOND MEETING OF THE PARTIES

A. Executive Committee established by decision II/8

44. Pursuant to paragraphs 2 and 3 of the terms of reference of the Executive Committee laid down in appendix II of decision II/8 (annex IV to the present report), the Meeting endorsed the selection by the groups concerned of following States to serve on the first Executive Committee:

The Meeting further endorsed the selection of Finland to act as Chairman and of Mexico to act as ViceChairman for the first year of the Executive Committee.

45. The President pointed out that the selection of nominees had been endorsed on the understanding that, within the threeyear mandate of the Executive Committee, members representing either one or the other of the two groups referred to in paragraph 2 of the terms of reference of the Committee could be changed in accordance with the wishes of the group concerned.

46. The representative of Trinidad and Tobago said that small islands and lowlying countries were particularly threatened by changes in the environment. He hoped that in future their interests could be explicitly represented in decisionmaking bodies.

B. Implementation Committee established by decision II/5

47. Pursuant to paragraph 3 of the noncompliance procedure adopted by its decision II/5, the meeting elected the following Parties to serve on the Implementation Committee established under the noncompliance procedure: Japan, Norway, Trinidad and Tobago, Hungary and Uganda, with the understanding arrived at during the informal consultations that the two last mentioned States were elected for a oneyear term.

C. Ad Hoc Technical Advisory Committee on Destruction Technologies

48. Pursuant to the first paragraph of decision II/11, the Meeting appointed Canada as Chairman of the Ad Hoc Technical Advisory Committee on Destruction Technologies.

VI. DECLARATIONS AND RESOLUTIONS

A. Declarations

  • 49. The representative of New Zealand drew attention to the following declaration by Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Federal Republic of Germany, Liechtenstein, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland:

    50. The representative of the Commission of the European Communities said that the Commission wished to associate itself with the above declaration. It had reluctantly accepted a programme of reductions for CFCs which did not give the degree of protection for the ozone layer that the Community considered necessary. The latest scientific evidence in ozone depletion over high northern and southern latitudes, as well as the increasing preoccupation with the greenhouse properties of CFCs, required that the Parties reconsidered its decision; that review should take place within the context of the review foreseen for 1992 with a view to the complete elimination of CFCs at the earliest possible date.

    B. Resolution by the Governments and the European Communities represented at the Second Meeting of the Parties

    51. The Governments and the European Communities represented at the Meeting adopted an amended version (UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.2/Rev.1) of the draft resolution submitted for the consideration of the Meeting by the OpenEnded Working Group. The text of the resolution as adopted appears in annex VII to the present report.

    VII. OTHER MATTERS

    52. There were no other matters.

    VIII. ADOPTION OF THE REPORT

  • 53. The Meeting adopted the present report, on the basis of the draft report contained in document UNEP/OzL.Pro.2/L.7, at its closing session, on 29 June 1990.

    IX. CLOSURE OF THE MEETING

    54. After the customary exchange of courtesies, the President declared the meeting closed at 9.30 p.m. on Friday, 29 June 1990.

    Annex I

    ADJUSTMENTS TO THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL ON SUBSTANCES THAT DEPLETE THE OZONE LAYER

    The Second Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer decides, on the basis of assessments made pursuant to Article 6 of the Protocol, to adopt adjustments and reductions of production and consumption of the controlled substances in Annex A to the Protocol, as follows, with the understanding that:

    A. Article 2A: CFCs

    Paragraph 1 of Article 2 of the Protocol shall become paragraph 1 of Article 2A, which shall be entitled "Article 2A: CFCs". Paragraphs 3 and 4 of Article 2 shall be replaced by the following paragraphs, which shall be numbered paragraphs 2 to 6 of Article 2A:

    B. Article 2B: Halons

    Paragraph 2 of Article 2 of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following paragraphs, which shall be numbered paragraphs 1 to 4 of Article 2B:

    Article 2B: Halons

    Annex II

    AMENDMENT TO THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL ON SUBSTANCES THAT DEPLETE THE OZONE LAYER

    ARTICLE 1: AMENDMENT

    A. Preambular paragraphs

    1. The 6th preambular paragraph of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following:

    2. The 7th preambular paragraph of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following:

    3. The 9th preambular paragraph of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following:

    B. Article 1: Definitions

    1. Paragraph 4 of Article 1 of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following paragraph:

    2. Paragraph 5 of Article 1 of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following paragraph:

    3. The following paragraph shall be added to Article 1 of the Protocol:

    C. Article 2, paragraph 5

    Paragraph 5 of Article 2 of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following paragraph:

    D. Article 2, paragraph 6

    The following words shall be inserted in paragraph 6 of Article 2 before the words "controlled substances" the first time they occur:

    E. Article 2, paragraph 8 (a)

    The following words shall be added after the words "this Article" wherever they appear in paragraph 8 (a) of Article 2 of the Protocol:

    F. Article 2, paragraph 9 (a) (i)

    The following words shall be added after "Annex A" in paragraph 9 (a) (i) of Article 2 of the Protocol:

    G. Article 2, paragraph 9 (a) (ii)

    The following words shall be deleted from paragraph 9 (a) (ii) of Article 2 of the Protocol:

    H. Article 2, paragraph 9 (c)

    The following words shall be deleted from paragraph 9 of Article 2 of the Protocol:

    and replaced by:

    I. Article 2, paragraph 10 (b)

    Paragraph 10 (b) of Article 2 of the Protocol shall be deleted, and paragraph 10 (a) of Article 2 shall become paragraph 10.

    J. Article 2, paragraph 11

    The following words shall be added after the words "this Article" wherever they occur in paragraph 11 of Article 2 of the Protocol:

    K. Article 2C: Other fully halogenated CFCs

    The following paragraphs shall be added to the Protocol as Article 2C:

    Article 2C: Other fully halogenated CFCs

    L. Article 2D: Carbon tetrachloride

    The following paragraphs shall be added to the Protocol as Article 2D:

    Article 2D: Carbon tetrachloride

    M. Article 2E: 1,1,1trichloroethane (methyl chloroform)

    The following paragraphs shall be added to the Protocol as Article 2E:

    Article 2E: 1,1,1trichloroethane (methyl chloroform)

    N. Article 3: Calculation of control levels

    1. The following shall be added after "Articles 2" in Article 3 of the Protocol:

    2. The following words shall be added after "Annex A" each time it appears in Article 3 of the Protocol:

    O. Article 4: Control of trade with nonParties

    1. Paragraphs 1 to 5 of Article 4 shall be replaced by the following paragraphs:

    2. Paragraph 8 of Article 4 of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following paragraph:

    3. The following paragraph shall be added to Article 4 of the Protocol as paragraph 9:

    P. Article 5: Special situation of developing countries

    Article 5 of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following:

    Q. Article 6: Assessment and review of control measures

    The following words shall be added after "Article 2" in Article 6 of the Protocol:

    R. Article 7: Reporting of data

    1. Article 7 of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following:

    S. Article 9: Research, development, public awareness and exchange of information

    Paragraph 1 (a) of Article 9 of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following:

    T. Article 10: Financial mechanism

    Article 10 of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following:

    Article 10: Financial mechanism

    U. Article 10A: Transfer of technology

    The following Article shall be added to the Protocol as Article 10A:

    Article 10A: Transfer of technology

    Each Party shall take every practicable step, consistent with the programmes supported by the financial mechanism, to ensure:

    V. Article 11: Meetings of the Parties

    Paragraph 4 (g) of Article 11 of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following:

    W. Article 17: Parties joining after entry into force

    The following words shall be added after "as well as under" in Article 17:

    X. Article 19: Withdrawal

    Article 19 of the Protocol shall be replaced by the following paragraph:

    Y. Annexes

    The following annexes shall be added to the Protocol: Annex B

    Controlled substances

    
    
    __________________________________________________________
    
    
    Group Substance Ozone depleting
    
    
     potential
    
    
    __________________________________________________________
    
    
    Group I
    
    
    CF3C1 (CFC13) 1.0
    
    
    C2FC15 (CFC111) 1.0
    
    
    C2F2C14 (CFC112) 1.0
    
    
    C3FC17 (CFC211) 1.0
    
    
    C3F2C16 (CFC212) 1.0
    
    
    C3F3C15 (CFC213) 1.0
    
    
    C3F4C14 (CFC214) 1.0
    
    
    C3F5C13 (CFC215) 1.0
    
    
    C3F6C12 (CFC216) 1.0
    
    
    C3F7C1 (CFC217) 1.0
    
    
    Group II
    
    
    CC14 carbon tetrachloride 1.1
    
    
    Group III
    
    
    C2H3Cl3* 1,1,1trichloroethane 0.1
    
    
     (methyl chloroform)
    
    
    __________________________________________________________
    
    
    * This formula does not refer to 1,1,2trichloroethane.
    
    
    
    Annex C

    Transitional substances

    
    
    __________________________________________________________
    
    
    Group Substance 
    
    
     
    
    
    __________________________________________________________
    
    
    Group I
    
    
    CHFC12 (HCFC21)
    
    
    CHF2C1 (HCFC22)
    
    
    CH2FC1 (HCFC31)
    
    
    C2HFC14 (HCFC121)
    
    
    C2HF2C13 (HCFC122)
    
    
    C2HF3C12 (HCFC123)
    
    
    C2HF4C1 (HCFC124)
    
    
    C2H2FC13 (HCFC131)
    
    
    C2H2F2C12 (HCFC132)
    
    
    C2H2F3C1 (HCFC133)
    
    
    C2H3FC12 (HCFC141)
    
    
    C2H3F2C1 (HCFC142)
    
    
    C2H4FCl (HCFC151)
    
    
    C3HFCl6 (HCFC221)
    
    
    C3HF2C15 (HCFC222)
    
    
    C3HF3C14 (HCFC223)
    
    
    C3HF4C13 (HCFC224)
    
    
    C3HF5C12 (HCFC225)
    
    
    C3HF6C1 (HCFC226)
    
    
    C3H2FC15 (HCFC231)
    
    
    C3H2F2C14 (HCFC232)
    
    
    C3H2F3C13 (HCFC233)
    
    
    C3H2F4C12 (HCFC234)
    
    
    C3H2F5C1 (HCFC235)
    
    
    C3H3FC14 (HCFC241)
    
    
    C3H3F2C13 (HCFC242)
    
    
    C3H3F3C12 (HCFC243)
    
    
    C3H3F4C1 (HCFC244)
    
    
    C3H4FC13 (HCFC251)
    
    
    C3H4F2C12 (HCFC252)
    
    
    C3H4F3C1 (HCFC253)
    
    
    C3H5FC12 (HCFC261)
    
    
    C3H5F2C1 (HCFC262)
    
    
    C3H6FC1 (HCFC271)
    
    
    __________________________________________________________
    
    
    
    ARTICLE 2: ENTRY INTO FORCE

    1. This Amendment shall enter into force on 1 January 1992, provided that at/least twenty instruments of ratification, acceptance or approval of the Amendment have been deposited by States or regional economic integration organizations that are Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. In the event that this condition has not been fulfilled by that date, the Amendment shall enter into force on the ninetieth day following the date on which it has been fulfilled.

    2. For the purposes of paragraph 1, any such instrument deposited by a regional economic integration organization shall not be counted as additional to those deposited by member States of such organization.

    3. After the entry into force of this Amendment as provided under paragraph/1, it shall enter into force for any other Party to the Protocol on/the ninetieth day following the date of deposit of its instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval.

    Annex III

    NONCOMPLIANCE PROCEDURE

    1. If one or more Parties have reservations regarding another Party's implementation of its obligations under the Protocol, those concerns may be addressed in writing to the Secretariat. Such a submission shall be supported by corroborating information.

    2. The Party whose implementation is at issue is to be given the submission and a reasonable opportunity to reply. Such reply and information in support thereof is to be submitted to the Secretariat and to the Parties involved. The Secretariat shall then transmit the submission, the reply and the information provided by the Parties, to the Implementation Committee referred to in paragraph 3, which shall consider the matter as soon as practicable.

    3. An Implementation Committee is hereby established. It shall consist of five Parties elected by the Meeting of the Parties for two years, based on equitable geographical distribution. Outgoing Parties may also be reelected for one immediate consecutive term. At the first election, two Parties shall be elected for a oneyear term.

    4. The Committee shall meet as necessary to perform its functions.

    5. The functions of the Committee shall be to receive, consider and report on:

    6. The Committee shall consider the submissions, information and observations referred to in paragraph 5 with a view to securing an amicable resolution of the matter on the basis of respect for the provisions of the Protocol.

    7. The Committee shall report to the Meeting of the Parties. After receiving a report by the Committee the Parties may, taking into consideration the circumstances of the case, decide upon and call for steps to bring about full compliance with the Protocol, including measures to assist the Party's compliance with the Protocol, and to further the Protocol's objectives.

    8. The Parties involved in a matter referred to in paragraph 5 shall inform, through the Secretariat, the Meeting of the Parties of the results of proceedings taken under Article 11 of the Convention regarding possible noncompliance, about implementation of those results and about implementation of any decision of the Parties pursuant to paragraph 7.

    9. The Meeting of the Parties may, pending completion of proceedings initiated under Article 11 of the Convention, issue an interim call and/or recommendations.

    10. The Meeting of the Parties may request the Committee to make recommendations to assist the Meeting's consideration of cases of possible noncompliance.

    11. The members of the Committee and any Party involved in its deliberations shall protect the confidentiality of information they receive in confidence.

    Annex IV

    APPENDICES TO DECISION II/8 ("FINANCIAL MECHANISM")
    ADOPTED BY THE SECOND MEETING OF THE PARTIES

    Appendix I

    INDICATIVE LIST OF CATEGORIES OF INCREMENTAL COSTS

    1. The evaluation of requests for financing incremental costs of a given project shall take into account the following general principles:

    2. Incremental costs that once agreed are to be met by the financial mechanism include those listed below. If incremental costs other than those mentioned below are identified and quantified, a decision as to whether they are to be met by the financial mechanism shall be taken by the Executive Committee consistent with any criteria decided by the Parties and elaborated in the guidelines of the Executive Committee. The incremental recurring costs apply only for a transition period to be defined. The following list is indicative:

    Appendix II

    TERMS OF REFERENCE OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

    1. The Executive Committee of the Parties is established to develop and monitor the implementation of specific operational policies, guidelines and administrative arrangements including the disbursement of resources, for the purpose of achieving the objectives of the Multilateral Fund under the Financial Mechanism.

    2. The Executive Committee shall consist of seven Parties from the group of Parties operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 of the Protocol and seven Parties from the group of Parties not so operating. Each group shall select its Executive Committee members. The members of the Executive Committee shall be formally endorsed by the Meeting of the Parties.

    3. The Chairman and ViceChairman shall be selected from the fourteen Executive Committee members. The office of Chairman is subject to rotation, on an annual basis, between the Parties operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5, and the Parties not so operating. The group of Parties entitled to the chairmanship shall select the Chairman from among their members of the Executive Committee. The ViceChairman shall be selected by the other group from within their number.

    4. Decisions by the Executive Committee shall be taken by consensus whenever possible. If all efforts at consensus have been exhausted and no agreement reached, decisions shall be taken by a twothirds majority of the Parties present and voting, representing a majority of the Parties operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 and a majority of the Parties not so operating present and voting.

    5. The meetings of the Executive Committee shall be conducted in those official languages of the United Nations required by members of the Executive Committee. Nevertheless the Executive Committee may agree to conduct its business in one of the United Nations official languages.

    6. Costs of Executive Committee meetings, including travel and subsistence of Committee participants from Parties operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5, shall be disbursed from the Multilateral Fund as necessary.

    7. The Executive Committee shall ensure that the expertise required to perform its functions is available to it.

    8. The Executive Committee shall meet at least twice a year.

    9. The Executive Committee shall adopt other rules of procedure on a provisional basis and in accordance with paragraphs 1 to 8 of these terms of reference. Such provisional rules of procedure shall be submitted to the next annual meeting of the Parties for endorsement. This procedure shall also be followed when such rules of procedure are amended.

    10. The functions of the Executive Committee shall include:

    Appendix III

    MULTILATERAL FUND FOR THE FINANCIAL MECHANISM: SCALE OF CONTRIBUTIONS BY THE PARTIES BASED ON THE UNITED NATIONS SCALE OF ASSESSMENT WITH NO COUNTRY PAYING MORE THAN 25 PER CENT FOR 1991, 1992, AND 1993

    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    Party UN scale Percentages Pledges for Pledges for Pledges for 
    
    
     of based on the 1991 1992 1993
    
    
     contribution United Nations (US $) (US $) (US $)
    
    
     (%) scale with a 25 
    
    
     per cent ceiling
    
    
     (%)
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    Developing countries that are not operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5
    
    
    Brazil 1.45 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Burkina Faso 0.01 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Cameroon 0.01 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Chile 0.08 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Ecuador 0.03 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Egypt 0.07 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Fiji 0.01 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Ghana 0.01 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Guatemala 0.02 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Jordan 0.01 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Kenya 0.01 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Malaysia 0.11 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Maldives 0.01 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Mexico 0.94 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Nigeria 0.20 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Sri Lanka 0.01 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Syrian Arab Republic 0.04 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Thailand 0.10 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Trinidad and Tobago 0.05 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Tunisia 0.03 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Uganda 0.01 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Venezuela 0.57 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Zambia 0.01 0.00 0 0 0
    
    
    Bahrain 0.02 0.02 12 553 12 553 12 553
    
    
    Malta 0.01 0.01 6 276 6 276 6 276
    
    
    Panama 0.02 0.02 12 553 12 553 12 553
    
    
    Singapore 0.11 0.13 69 041 69 041 69 041
    
    
    United Arab Emirates 0.19 0.22 119 253 119 253 119 253
    
    
    Developed countries
    
    
    Australia 1.57 1.85 985 407 985 407 985 407
    
    
    Austria 0.74 0.87 464 459 464 459 464 459
    
    
    Byelorussian SSR 0.33 0.39 207 124 207 124 207 124
    
    
    Canada 3.09 3.64 1 939 432 1 939 432 1 939 432
    
    
    Finland 0.51 0.60 320 100 320 100 320 100
    
    
    German Democratic Rep. 1.28 1.51 803 389 803 389 803 389
    
    
    Hungary 0.21 0.25 131 806 131 806 131 806
    
    
    Iceland 0.03 0.04 18 829 18 829 18 829
    
    
    Japan 11.38 13.39 7 142 633 7 142 633 7 142 633
    
    
    Liechtenstein 0.01 0.01 6 276 6 276 6 276
    
    
    New Zealand 0.24 0.28 150 635 150 635 150 635
    
    
    Norway 0.55 0.65 345 206 345 206 345 206
    
    
    South Africa 0.45 0.53 282 442 282 442 282 442
    
    
    Sweden 1.21 1.42 759 454 759 454 759 454
    
    
    Switzerland 1.08 1.27 677 860 677 860 677 860
    
    
    Ukrainian SSR 1.25 1.47 784 560 784 560 784 560
    
    
    USSR 9.99 11.76 6 270 202 6 270 202 6 270 202
    
    
    United States 25.00 25.00 13 333 333 13 333 333 13 333 333 
    
    
    EEC 
    
    
    EEC
    
    
    (total for member States)29.46 34.67
    
    
    Belgium 1.17 1.38 734 348 734 348 734 348
    
    
    Denmark 0.69 0.81 433 077 433 077 433 077
    
    
    France 6.25 7.36 3 922 799 3 922 799 3 922 799
    
    
    Germany, Federal Rep. of 8.08 9.51 5 071 395 5 071 395 5 071 395
    
    
    Greece 0.40 0.47 251 059 251 059 251 059
    
    
    Ireland 0.18 0.21 112 977 112 977 112 977
    
    
    Italy 3.99 4.70 2 540 315 2 540 315 2 540 315
    
    
    Luxembourg 0.06 0.07 37 659 37 659 37 659
    
    
    Netherlands 1.65 1.94 1 035 619 1 035 619 1 035 619
    
    
    Portugal 0.18 0.21 112 977 112 977 112 977
    
    
    Spain 1.95 2.29 1 223 913 1 223 913 1 223 913
    
    
    United Kingdom 4.86 5.72 3 050 369 3 050 369 3 050 369
    
    
     ___________________________________________________________________
    
    
    TOTAL 92.52 100.00 53 333 333 53 333 333 53 333 333
    
    
     =================================================================== 
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 
    
    
    

    Appendix IV

    TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR THE INTERIM MULTILATERAL FUND

    A. Establishment

    1. An interim Multilateral Fund, of $160 million, which could be raised by up to $80 million during the threeyear period when more countries become Parties to the Protocol, hereinafter referred to as "the Multilateral Fund", shall be established.

    B. Roles of the implementing agencies

    2. Under the overall guidance and supervision of the Executive Committee in the discharge of its policymaking functions:

    Implementing agencies shall apply only those considerations relevant to effective and economically efficient progammes and projects which are consistent with any criteria adopted by the Parties.

    3. Specifically,

    4. The Executive Committee shall draw up reporting criteria and shall invite the implementing agencies to report regularly to it in accordance with those criteria.

    5. The Executive Committee shall invite the implementing agencies, in fulfilling their responsibilities in respect of the Multilateral Fund, to consult each other regularly. It shall also invite the heads of the agencies, or their representatives, to meet at least once a year to report on their activities and consult on cooperative arrangements.

    6. The implementing agencies shall be entitled to receive support costs for the activities they undertake having reached specific agreements with the Executive Committee.

    C. Budget and contributions

    7. The Multilateral Fund shall be financed in accordance with paragraph 7 of decision II/8. In addition, contributions may be made by countries not Party to the Protocol, and by other governmental, intergovernmental, nongovernmental and other sources.

    8. The contributions referred to in paragraph 7 above are to be based on the scale of contributions set out in Appendix III. Bilateral, and in particular cases, regional cooperation by a country not operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 may, according to criteria adopted by the Parties, be considered as a contribution to the Multilateral Fund up to a total of twenty per cent of the total contribution by that Party set out in Appendix III.

    9. All contributions other than the value of bilateral and agreed regional cooperation referred to in paragraph 8 above shall be in convertible currency or, in certain circumstances, in kind and/or in national currency.

    10. Contributions from States that become Parties not operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 after the beginning of the financial period of the mechanism shall be calculated on a pro rata basis for the balance of the financial period.

    11. Contributions not immediately required for the purposes of the Multilateral Fund shall be invested under the authority of the Executive Committee and any interest so earned shall be credited to the Multilateral Fund.

    12. Budget estimates, setting out the income and expenditure of the Multilateral Fund prepared in United States dollars, shall be drawn up by the Executive Committee and submitted to the regular meetings of the Parties to the Protocol.

    13. The proposed budget estimates shall be dispatched by the Fund Secretariat to all Parties to the Protocol at least sixty days before the date fixed for the opening of the regular meeting of the Parties to the Protocol at which they are to be considered.

    14. After entry into force of the Amendment to the Protocol, the Financial Mechanism shall be established by the Parties at their next regular meeting and any resources remaining in the interim Multilateral Fund shall be transferred to the multilateral fund established under that mechanism.

    D. Administration

    15. The World Bank shall be invited by the Executive Committee to cooperate with and assist it in administering and managing the programme to finance the agreed incremental costs of Parties operating under paragraph/1 of Article 5. Should the World Bank accept this invitation, in the context of an agreement with the Executive Committee, the President of the World Bank shall be the Administrator of this programme, which shall operate under the authority of the Executive Committee.

    16. The Executive Committee shall encourage the involvement of other agencies, in particular the regional development banks, in carrying out its functions effectively in relation to the programme to finance the agreed incremental costs.

    17. The Fund Secretariat operating under the Chief Officer, colocated with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) at a place to be decided by the Executive Committee, shall assist the Executive Committee in the discharge of its functions. The Multilateral Fund shall cover Secretariat costs, based on regular budgets to be submitted for decision by the Executive Committee.

    18. In the event that the Chief Officer of the Fund Secretariat anticipates that there may be a shortfall in resources over the financial period as a whole, he shall have discretion to adjust the budget approved by the Parties so that expenditures are at all times fully covered by contributions received.

    19. No commitments shall be made in advance of the receipt of contributions, but income not spent in a budget year and unimplemented activities may be carried forward from one year to the next within the financial period.

    20. At the end of each calendar year, the Chief Officer of the Fund Secretariat shall submit to the Parties accounts for the year. The Chief Officer shall also, as soon as practicable, submit the audited accounts for each period so as to coincide with the accounting procedures of the implementing agencies.

    21. The Fund Secretariat and the implementing agencies shall cooperate with the Parties to provide information on funding available for relevant projects, to secure the necessary contacts and to coordinate, when requested by the interested Party, projects financed from other sources with activities financed under the Protocol.

    22. The financing of activities or other costs, including resources channelled to third party beneficiaries, shall require the concurrence of the recipient Governments concerned. Recipient Governments shall, where appropriate, be associated with the planning of projects and programmes.

    23. Nothing shall preclude a beneficiary Party operating under paragraph 1 of Article 5 from applying for its requirements for agreed incremental costs solely from the resources available to the Multilateral Fund.

    Annex V

    PROVISIONAL BUDGET FOR THE MULTILATERAL FUND SECRETARIAT UNDER THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL FOR 1991
    (United States dollars)

    
    
     1991
    
    
     
    
    
    1100 Project personnel
    
    
     
    
    
    	1101	Chief, Fund Secretarial 
    
    
     Services 1/ 90 000
    
    
    	1102	Deputy Chief, Fund (Economist) (P-4/P-5) 80 000
    
    
    	1103	Deputy Chief, clearing-house
    
    
     (Engineer) (P-4/P-5) 80 000
    
    
     1104 Programme officer (Economist) (P-3) 70 000
    
    
     1105 Programme officer (Engineer) (P-3) 70 000
    
    
     1106 Programme officer (Engineer) (P-3) 70 000
    
    
     1107 Programme officer (Environmental scientist) (P-3) 70 000
    
    
     1108 Programme officer (Environmental scientist) (P-3) 70 000
    
    
     1109 Administrative officer (P-2) 50 000
    
    
     1110 Fund management officer (P-2) 50 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 700 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    1200 Consultants
    
    
     1201 Financial mechanisms 55 000
    
    
     1202 Country-specific studies 2 000 000
    
    
    	1203	Technology transfer and technical co-operation 1 500 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 3 555 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
     1/ For the purposes of this budget,
    
    
    the cost of Chief of the Fund Secretarial Services has been calculated
    
    
    at the D-1 level. Should the Executive Committee wish to have the Chief
    
    
    at the D-2 level, the additional cost will be $10,000 each year.
    
    
    1300 Administrative support
    
    
     1301 Senior secretary 14 000
    
    
     1302 Senior secretary 14 000
    
    
     1303 Secretary 12 000
    
    
     1304 Secretary 12 000
    
    
     1305 Secretary 12 000
    
    
     1306 Secretary 12 000
    
    
     1307 Administrative assistant 14 000
    
    
     1308 Administrative assistant 14 000
    
    
    1320 Conference-servicing costs (interpreters,
    
    
     translators, typists, etc)
    
    
     1320 Regional workshops (6) 500 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 604 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    1600 Travel on official business
    
    
    	1601	Travel and subsistence costs of 
    
    
     Secretariat staff members 25 000
    
    
    	1602	Travel and subsistence costs of 
    
    
     conference-servicing staff 25 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 50 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    30 Training
    
    
    	3200	Training courses
    
    
     3201 Training courses 500 000 
    
    
     3300 Workshops
    
    
    	3301	Travel and subsistence costs of 
    
    
     participants to workshops (3 each year) 465 000 
    
    
     
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 965 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    40 Equipment
    
    
     4100 Miscellaneous 10 000
    
    
     4202 Photocopier (2) 10 000
    
    
     4203 Personal computers (4) 32 000
    
    
     4204 Portable computers (4) 16 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 68 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    50 Miscellaneous
    
    
     5100 Maintenance of equipment 6 000
    
    
     5200 Reporting 10 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 16 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    53 Sundry
    
    
     5301 Communications 30 000
    
    
     5301 Freight charges (shipment of documents) 5 000
    
    
     5303 Other 10 000
    
    
     5304 Hospitality 3 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 48 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    Contingency fund 600 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    TOTAL 6 606 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    Programme support costs (13%) 859 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    GRAND TOTAL 7 465 000
    
    
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    

    Annex VI

    I. REVISED BUDGET UNDER THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL FOR THE YEAR 1990
    (United States dollars)

    
    
     Budget as Increase Total
    
    
     adopted in 
    
    
     Helsinki
    
    
    1100 Project personnel (to be shared between the
    
    
     Convention and the 
    
    
     Protocol)
    
    
     1101 Co-ordinator (Lawyer) (P-4/P-5) 40 000 - 40 000
    
    
     1102 Programme officer (Scientist) (P-3/P-4) 34 000 - 34 000
    
    
     1103 Administrative officer (P-2) 23 000 - 23 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 97 000 - 97 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    1200 Consultants 1/
    
    
     1201 Consultants 30 000 240 000 270 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 30 000 240 000 270 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    1300 Administrative support
    
    
     1301 Administrative assistant 
    
    
     (to be shared with the Convention) 6 500 - 6 500
    
    
     1302 Secretary 12 000 - 12 000
    
    
     Conference-servicing costs
    
    
    	1321	Second Meeting of the Parties
    
    
     to the Protocol 173 000 - 173 000
    
    
     1322 Regional workshops (3) - 620 000 620 000
    
    
     1323 Working Group meetings (6) 2/ 135 000 615 000 750 000
    
    
     1324 Meetings of the Bureau 35 000 35 000 70 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 361 500 1 270 000 1 631 500
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    1600 Travel on official business
    
    
    	1600	Travel and subsistence costs of 
    
    
     UNEP staff members 60 000 30 000 90 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 60 000 30 000 90 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    3300 Meeting/conferences
    
    
     Travel and subsistence cost of experts
    
    
     from developing countries to participate 
    
    
     in the:
    
    
     3301 Second Meeting of the Parties (1990) 35 000 165 000 200 000
    
    
     3302 Regional workshops - 70 000 70 000
    
    
     3303 Working group meetings (6) 105 000 240 000 345 000
    
    
    	3304	Travel and daily subsistence allowance
    
    
     of participants of the Bureau 35 000 - 35 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 175 000 475 000 650 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    4000 Equipment 20 000 - 20 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 20 000 - 20 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    5000 Miscellaneous
    
    
     5100 Maintenance of equipment 3 000 - 3 000
    
    
     5200 Reporting costs 3/ 5 000 172 000 177 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 8 000 172 000 180 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    5300 Sundry
    
    
     5301 Communications 10 000 10 000 20 000
    
    
    	5302	Freight charges (shipment of
    
    
     documents) 7 000 8 000 15 000
    
    
     5303 Other 5 000 5 000 10 000
    
    
     5400 Hospitality 10 000 15 000 25 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 32 000 38 000 70 000
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    TOTAL 783 500 2 225 000 3 008 500
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    Programme support costs (13%) 100 000 291 500 391 500
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    GRAND TOTAL 883 500 2 516 500 3 400 000 
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     1/ Consultants for preparing a data base on the controlled
    
    
    substances, studies on financial mechanisms, country studies and preparations for the Second
    
    
    Meeting of the Parties.
    
    
     2/ Based on the experience in 1989, the total
    
    
    conference-servicing costs of a Working Group meeting of 4-5 days are estimated at approximately 
    
    
    $20,000per working language and approximately $5,000 for secretarial support. Thus, a
    
    
    Working Group meeting using three working languages would cost approximately $65,000. The cost
    
    
    will vary depending on the level of daily subsistence allowance applicable at the venue of the
    
    
    meeting. For the purpose of this budget, Geneva has been taken as the venue.
    
    
     3/ Including translation, reproduction and dissemination of the
    
    
    executive summaries of the assessment panel reports, the synthesis report, the report of the
    
    
    Technology Review Panel and the five technical options reports.
    
    
    
    II. TRUST FUND FOR THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL ON SUBSTANCES THAT DEPLETE THE OZONE LAYER

    Contribution to the costs of Ozone Secretariat for 1990 (expressed in US dollars)

    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
     A B C D E F G
    
    
    Party Trust Fund Additional Percentage Adjusted Total Paid for Balance 
    
    
     pledges funds of total additional adjusted 1990 to be paid 
    
    
     for 1990 a/ requested b/ costs c/ pledge for pledges (as at
    
    
     (US $) (US $) ( % ) 1990 (A + B + D) 15 June 1990) (E - F)
    
    
     ($133,656 x C) (US $) (US $) (US $)
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    Australia 16 108 39 721 1.70 2 272 58 101 0 58 101
    
    
    Austria 7 592 18 722 0.80 1 071 27 385 0 27 385
    
    
    Bahrain 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Belgium 12 000 29 920 1.27 1 693 43 613 0 43 613
    
    
    Brazil 11 158 27 514 1.57 2 099 40 771 0 40 771
    
    
    Burkina Faso 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Byelorussian SSR 3 385 8 360 0.36 478 12 223 0 12 223
    
    
    Cameroon 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Canada 31 694 78 980 3.35 4 472 115 146 31 694 83 452
    
    
    Chile 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Denmark 7 077 17 600 0.75 999 25 676 7 077 d/ 18 599
    
    
    Ecuador 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Egypt 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Fiji 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Finland 5 231 12 980 0.55 738 18 949 18 211 738
    
    
    France 64 105 159 720 6.77 9 046 232 871 0 232 871
    
    
    German Democratic
    
    
     Republic 14 257 35 420 1.39 1 853 51 530 14 257 37 273
    
    
    Germany, Federal
    
    
     Republic of 82 875 206 360 8.75 11 695 300 930 82 875 218 055
    
    
    Ghana 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Greece 4 103 10 120 0.43 579 14 802 0 14 802
    
    
    Guatemala 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Hungary 2 154 5 280 0.23 304 7 738 7 434 304
    
    
    Iceland 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Ireland 1 846 4 620 0.19 261 6 727 6 466 261
    
    
    Italy 40 925 101 860 4.32 5 755 148 560 0 148 560
    
    
    Japan 116 722 290 620 12.32 16 471 423 813 0 423 813
    
    
    Jordan 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Kenya 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Liechtenstein 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Luxembourg 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Malaysia 1 129 2 783 0.12 159 4 071 0 4 071
    
    
    Maldives 0 0 0.00 0 0 1 500 (1 500)
    
    
    Malta 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Mexico 9 641 23 980 1.02 1 361 34 982 0 34 982
    
    
    Netherlands 16 924 42 240 1.79 2 388 61 552 0 61 552
    
    
    New Zealand 2 462 6 160 0.26 347 8 969 8 622 347
    
    
    Nigeria 2 051 5 060 0.22 289 7 400 0 7 400
    
    
    Norway 5 641 17 124 0.60 796 23 561 19 721 e/ 3 840
    
    
    Panama 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Portugal 1 846 4 620 0.19 261 6 727 0 6 727
    
    
    Singapore 1 128 2 860 0.12 159 4 147 1 128 3 019
    
    
    South Africa 4 617 11 385 0.49 651 16 653 0 16 653
    
    
    Spain 20 001 49 720 2.11 2 822 72 543 0 72 543
    
    
    Sri Lanka 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Sweden 12 411 60 000 1.31 1 751 74 162 25 911 48 251
    
    
    Switzerland 11 077 27 500 1.17 1 563 40 140 27 500 12 640
    
    
    Syrian Arab Republic 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Thailand 1 026 2 530 0.11 145 3 701 0 3 701
    
    
    Trindad and Tobago 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Tunisia 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Uganda 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    Ukrainian SSR 12 821 31 900 1.35 1 809 46 530 0 46 530
    
    
    USSR 102 465 255 200 10.82 14 459 372 124 0 372 124
    
    
    United Arab Emirates 1 949 4 807 0.21 275 7 031 0 7 031
    
    
    United Kingdom 49 848 124 080 5.26 7 034 180 962 49 848 131 114
    
    
    USA 220 875 550 000 25.00 33 414 804 289 70 750 733 539
    
    
    Venezuela 5 846 14 520 0.62 825 21 191 0 21 191
    
    
    Zambia 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0
    
    
    EEC 22 088 55 000 2.50 3 341 80 429 22 088 58 341
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    TOTAL 927 078 2 339 266 100.00 133 656 3 400 000 395 082 3 004 918
    
    
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    a/ Level of contributions calculated on the basis of the scale of assessments agreed by the First Meeting of the
    
    
    Contracting Parties in May 1989, Helsinki.
    
    
    b/ The additional funds requested by the Open-Ended Working Group at the third session of its first meeting,
    
    
    18-22 September, 1989.
    
    
    c/ Calculated on the basis of the United Nations scale of assessments, as agreed by the First Meeting of the Parties.
    
    
    d/ $100,000 paid for support to participants from developing countries and studies on technology options in low
    
    
    income developing countries is removed from the table, as it is considered as special additional contribution.
    
    
    e/ $3,044 paid for support to participants from developing countries is removed from the table, as it is considered
    
    
    as special additional contribution.
    
    
    
    III. BUDGET FOR THE SECRETARIAT CORE COSTS UNDER THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL FOR 1991 AND 1992
    (United States dollars)
    
    
     1991 1992 Total
    
    
    1100 Project personnel
    
    
     1101 Secretary (Co-ordinator)(D-1) 90 000 92 000 182 000 
    
    
    	1102	Deputy Secretary (Lawyer)(P-4/P-5) 
    
    
     (shared with the 
    
    
     Vienna Convention) 40 000 41 000 81 000
    
    
     1103 Programme officer (Lawyer) (P-3) 70 000 72 000 142 000
    
    
    	1104	Programme officer (Chemist/
    
    
     environmental scientist)(shared 
    
    
     with the Vienna Convention) (P-3) 35 000 36 000 71 000
    
    
     
    
    
    	1105	Administrative officer (shared 
    
    
     with the Vienna Convention) (P-2) 25 000 26 000 51 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 260 000 267 000 527 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    1200 Consultants
    
    
     1201 Data reporting 30 000 30 000 60 000
    
    
    	1202	Preparations for the Meeting 
    
    
     of the Parties 10 000 10 000 20 000
    
    
     1203 Dissemination of information 10 000 10 000 20 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 50 000 50 000 100 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    1300 Administrative support
    
    
    	1301	Administrative assistant 
    
    
     (shared with the Vienna 
    
    
     Convention) 7 000 7 000 14 000
    
    
     1302 Senior secretary 14 000 14 000 28 000
    
    
     1303 Secretary 1/ 12 000 6 000 18 000
    
    
     1304 Secretary 1/ 12 000 6 000 18 000
    
    
    1320 Conference-servicing costs (interpreters,
    
    
    	translators, typists, etc)
    
    
    	
    
    
    	1321	Third Meeting of the Parties 
    
    
     to the Montreal Protocol 175 000 - 175 000
    
    
    	1322	Fourth Meeting of the Parties 
    
    
     to the Montreal Protocol - 175 000 175 000
    
    
    	1323	Working Group meetings (6) 480 000 240 000 720 000
    
    
    	1324	Meeting of the Bureau of the 
    
    
     Montreal Protocol (4) 70 000 70 000 140 000
    
    
    	1325	Informal consultations (4) 10 000 10 000 20 000
    
    
    	1326	Meeting of the assessment 
    
    
     panels 10 000 50 000 60 000
    
    
    	1327	Meetings of committees 
    
    
     established by the Parties 2/ 100 000 145 000 245 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 890 000 723 000 1 613 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    1600 Travel on official business
    
    
    	1601	Travel and subsistence costs of 
    
    
     Secretariat staff members 100 000 100 000 200 000
    
    
    	1602	Travel and subsistence costs of
    
    
     UNEP conference-servicing staff 40 000 20 000 60 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 140 000 120 000 260 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    3300 Meetings/conferences
    
    
    	3301	Travel and subsistence costs of 
    
    
     participants in the Working
    
    
     Group meetings
    
    
     (15 participants from developing
    
    
     countries per meeting, $3,500
    
    
     per participant) 210 000 105 000 315 000
    
    
    	3302	Travel and subsistence costs of 
    
    
     participants in the Meetings 
    
    
     of the Parties (30 participants 
    
    
     from developing countries) 100 000 100 000 200 000
    
    
    	3303	Travel and subsistence costs of 
    
    
     participants from developing 
    
    
     countries in the meetings of the 
    
    
     Bureau 35 000 35 000 70 000
    
    
    	3304	Travel and subsistence costs of 
    
    
     participants from developing 
    
    
     countries in assessment meetings 35 000 175 000 210 000
    
    
    	3305	Travel and subsistence costs of 
    
    
     participants from developing 
    
    
     countries in committee meetings 70 000 70 000 140 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 450 000 485 000 935 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    4000 Equipment
    
    
     4100 Miscellaneous 5 000 10 000 15 000
    
    
     4201 Telefax machine 5 000 - 5 000
    
    
     4202 Photocopier (1) 5 000 - 5 000
    
    
     4203 Personal computers (3) 24 000 - 24 000
    
    
     4204 Portable computers (3) 12 000 - 12 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 51 000 10 000 61 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    5000 Miscellaneous
    
    
    	5100	Maintenance of equipment 3 000 9 000 12 000
    
    
     5200 Reporting 30 000 35 000 65 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 33 000 44 000 77 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    5300 Sundry
    
    
     5301 Communications 30 000 30 000 60 000
    
    
     5301 Freight charges 15 000 15 000 30 000
    
    
     (shipment of documents)
    
    
     5303 Other 10 000 10 000 20 000
    
    
     5401 Hospitality 15 000 15 000 30 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    SUBTOTAL 70 000 70 000 140 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    Contingency Fund 200 000 200 000 400 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    TOTAL 2 144 000 1 969 000 4 113 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    Programme support costs (13%) 279 000 256 000 535 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    GRAND TOTAL 2 423 000 2 225 000 4 648 000
    
    
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    1/ To be shared with the Vienna Convention from 1992, when a new budget is adopted for the
    
    
    Convention.
    
    
    2/ The estimated cost per meeting (of 2-3 days) using three languages is approximately
    
    
    $11,000 per language. Three meetings are anticipated in 1991. Four meetings are anticipated 
    
    
    in 1992 at a cost of approximately $12,000 per language.
    
    
    
    IV. TRUST FUND FOR THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL ON SUBSTANCES THAT DEPLETE THE OZONE LAYER

    Contributions to the core costs of the Ozone Secretariat for 1991-1992

    
    
    _________________________________________________________________________
    
    
     
    
    
    Party Percentage of Pledges for Pledges for
    
    
     total costs* 1991 1992
    
    
     ($) ($)
    
    
    _________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    Australia 1.70 41 195 37 828
    
    
    Austria 0.80 19 417 17 830
    
    
    Bahrain 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Belgium 1.27 30 699 28 191
    
    
    Brazil 1.57 38 046 34 937
    
    
    Burkina Faso 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Byelorussian SSR 0.36 8 659 7 951
    
    
    Cameroon 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Canada 3.35 81 077 74 452
    
    
    Chile 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Denmark 0.75 18 105 16 625
    
    
    Ecuador 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Egypt 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Fiji 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Finland 0.55 13 382 12 288
    
    
    France 6.77 163 991 150 590
    
    
    German Democratic Republic 1.39 33 585 30 841
    
    
    Germany, Federal Republic of 8.75 212 008 194 683
    
    
    Ghana 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Greece 0.43 10 495 9 638
    
    
    Guatemala 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Hungary 0.23 5 510 5 060
    
    
    Iceland 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Ireland 0.19 4 723 4 337
    
    
    Italy 4.32 104 692 96 137
    
    
    Japan 12.32 298 595 274 195
    
    
    Jordan 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Kenya 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Liechtenstein 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Luxembourg 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Malaysia 0.12 2 886 2 650
    
    
    Maldives 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Malta 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Mexico 1.02 24 664 22 649
    
    
    Netherlands 1.79 43 294 39 756
    
    
    New Zealand 0.26 6 297 5 783
    
    
    Nigeria 0.22 5 248 4 819
    
    
    Norway 0.60 14 431 13 252
    
    
    Panama 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Portugal 0.19 4 723 4 337
    
    
    Singapore 0.12 2 886 2 650
    
    
    South Africa 0.49 11 807 10 843
    
    
    Spain 2.11 51 165 46 984
    
    
    Sri Lanka 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Sweden 1.31 31 749 29 154
    
    
    Switzerland 1.17 28 338 26 022
    
    
    Syrian Arab Republic 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Thailand 0.11 2 624 2 409
    
    
    Trinidad and Tobago 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Tunisia 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Uganda 0.00 0 0
    
    
    Ukrainian SSR 1.35 32 798 30 118
    
    
    USSR 10.82 262 124 240 704
    
    
    United Arab Emirates 0.21 4 985 4 578
    
    
    United Kingdom 5.26 127 520 117 099
    
    
    United States of America 25.00 605 750 556 250
    
    
    Venezuela 0.62 14 956 13 734
    
    
    Zambia 0.00 0 0
    
    
    EEC 2.50 60 575 55 625
    
    
    _________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    TOTAL 100.00 2 423 000 2 225 000 
    
    
    _________________________________________________________________________
    
    
    
    * Calculated on the basis of the United Nations scale of assessments, as agreed by the First Meeting of the Parties.

    Annex VII

    RESOLUTION BY THE GOVERNMENTS AND THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES REPRESENTED AT THE SECOND MEETING OF THE PARTIES TO THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL

    The Governments and the European Communities represented at the Second Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol

    Resolve:

    I. Other halons not listed in Annex A, Group II, of the Montreal Protocol ("Other halons")

    1. To refrain from authorizing or to prohibit production and consumption of fully halogenated compounds containing one, two or three carbon atoms and at least one atom each of bromine and fluorine,* and not listed in Group II of Annex A of the Montreal Protocol (hereafter called "other halons"), which are of such a chemical nature or such a quantity that they would pose a threat to the ozone layer;

    2. To refrain from using other halons except for those essential applications where other more environmentally suitable alternative substances or technologies are not yet available; and

    3. To report to the Secretariat to the Protocol estimates of their annual production and consumption of such other halons;

    II. Transitional substances

    1. To apply the following guidelines to facilitate the adoption of transitional substances with a low ozonedepleting potential, such as hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), where necessary, and their timely substitution by nonozone depleting and more environmentally suitable alternative substances or technologies:

    2. To review regularly the use of transitional substances, their contribution to ozone depletion and global warming, and the availability of alternative products and application technologies, with a view to their replacement by nonozone depleting and more environmentally suitable alternatives and as the scientific evidence requires: at present, this should be no later than 2040 and, if possible, no later than 2020;

    * (Reference is made to the list of other halons that will appear in the Montreal Protocol Handbook to be prepared by the Executive Director.)

    III. 1,1,1trichloroethane (methyl chloroform)

    1. To phase out production and consumption of methyl chloroform as soon as possible;

    2. To request the Technology Review Panel to investigate the earliest technically feasible dates for reductions and total phaseout; and

    3. To request the Technology Review Panel to report their findings to the preparatory meeting of the Parties with a view to the consideration by the Meeting of the Parties, not later than 1992;

    IV. More stringent measures

    1. To express appreciation to those Parties that have already taken measures more stringent and broader in scope than those required by the Protocol;

    2. To urge adoption, in accordance with the spirit of paragraph 11 of Article 2 of the Protocol, of such measures in order to protect the ozone layer.